FRED EDWIN. BOGGELN FEB. 17, 1869 JULY 14, 1938

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FRED EDWIN. BOGGELN FEB. 17, 1869 JULY 14, 1938

fred e boggeln
fred e boggeln 1938
Spouse: Sarah Ann Boggeln
Father: John Boggeln
Mother: Emma Jane Turell
Children: Frederick Edwin
Birth: 17 Feb 1869 Clare, Ireland
Death: 14 Jul 1938 Coronado, San Diego, California, USA
Residence: 1920 Coronado, San Diego, California, USA

Obituary Fred Boggeln 1938

obituary fred e boggeln
obituary fred e boggeln
Headd stone Fred E Boggeln
Headd stone Fred E Boggeln

Transcript: “Dad” Boggeln Called by Death Friends Shocked by News Of Unexpected Passing of Pioneerßesident The many friends of Fred E. (Dad) Boggeln were shocked to learn of his death at his home, 822 C Avenue, last Thursday night, July 14, after an illness of only three days. Possessed of a rugged constitution and always the picture of health, Mr. Boggeln’s fatal illness attacked him the previous Monday night and in spite of every medical expediency he failed to rally. Funeral services were held at the BradleyWoolman mortuary Monday afternoon, with Rev. John B. Osborn officiating. Interment was in Greenwood Memorial park. A resident of Coronado for the past 47 years, Mr. Boggeln numbered his friends by the score and was a familiar figure about Coronado. A native of Ireland, he chose a seafaring life at the age of 12, and sailed the seven «eas in all sorts of ships for ten years. His last berth as a seaman was on the “Scandinavia,” a tramp steamer on which he signed up as fireman for a cruise starting from Cardiff, Wales, with a cargo of coke for Santa Rosalia, on the west coast of Mexico. The trip across the Atlantic and around the Straits of Magellan was filled with hardships, not the least of which was subsistence on short rations. When the ship finally put in at San Diego in February, 1891, Boggeln and another member of the crew were seriously ill and although the skipper refused to provide medical aid he was compelled to do ao by the crew, who threatened mutiny. The two sick men were put ashore and taken to a hospital where it was not expected they would recover, and the “Scandinavia” pulled out shortly afterward with all their belongings. Before he had fully recovered, Mr. Boggeln left the hospital clad in over-alls and carpet slippers—-his entire worldly possessions—and came to Coronado where he obtained work as fireman at Hotel del Coronado. Hard work soon restored him to health and after three years at the hotel he sought other employment. He conducted a rooming house and hotel for a number of years, and about 17 years ago organized the Coronado Mutual Protective Patrol which he conducted until his death. An ardent lover of outdoor sports, with a special leaning toward baseball, he was a staunch supporter of every sports enterprise, giving freely of his time and means in promoting clean, healthful sports for the young people of the community. With civic pride strongly dominant in his makeup, Mr. Boggeln had always taken a keen interest in community affairs, his interest finding an outlet through membership and active participation in every organization devoted to the advancement of the city in whose upbuilding he had played an important part. He was a member of the Eagles Lodge, the Foresters of America, the Coronado Chamber of Commerce and the Coronado Rotary Club. Mr. Boggeln was the husband of Mrs. Sara Boggeln; father of Frederick Boggeln jr.; Thomas Boggeln, Mrs. Pete Glynn, Mrs. H. W. Taylor, all of Coronado; Mrs. A. F. Gill, Honolulu, and Mrs. Ray Conrad, Camarillo, Calif.; stepfather of Henry James Marshall, Pasadena; Mrs. Florence Hayes and Mrs. Daisy Seevers of National City and Mrs. Amy Miller, Newport Beach, Calif.; and four grandchildren and one great grandson

HMS service letter to mom

War Journal Fred E Boggeln
War Journal Fred E Boggeln

Transcript:
Fred Boggeln Writes Of War Experiences And Appreciation Of American Ideals
Men who are on the war fronts think serious thoughts, and the world they once took for granted becomes a real and greatly to be desired place, the preservation of which they are willing to attempt at any cost. Among letters coming to parents qtf boys Who left Coronado for the war, is the following written by Fred E. Boggeln, Jr., Jreoman, second claSs, U.S.N., to his mother, Mrs. F. E. Boggeln of 822 C ave. Yeoman Boggeln was bom and grew up in Coronado. He will be 20 years old on March 27. His ship the North hampton, was sunk during the battle of the Solomons. The letter is dated February 16, 1944, and is one of the most interesting among letters from overseas c/o Fleet Post Office, San Francisco, California 16 February, 1944. “Dear Mother: “Hello and how is the family? I am feeling fine and am in perfect health. I have just come down from the radio shack to write this letter. While I was up there I heard Sammy Kaye, Phil Harris, and Horace Heidt and they were all coming over KNX. It sure made me feel homesick. You know I ‘haven’t seen home in over a year and sometimes when I am alone I sure do think about the old place and the things I used to do. You know you never appreciate your home until you are away from it a little while. It’s hard to explain but sometimes I think back as far as seven years ago and just think what I used to do. Those were the good old days. I didn’t realize at the time they were, I just took them for granted but if I ever get the chance to do them again you can bet your life I will really appreciate them. “Since the start of the war many of my ideas have changed, but not for the worse. It is just my outlook on things. Not really big things, but
little things that in normal times I wouldn’t have given a second thought to. “The war has brought these little things out in a clearer picture for me to see, and it has done me a lot of good. I never did fully appreciate what you and Dad did for me. I didn’t fully appreciate my home. I didn’t fully appreciate my friends. I didn’t fully appreciate the good times I had. I didn’t fully appreciate my town. The reason I didn’t was I took them all for granted. I didn’t realize what they fully meant until I had to leave them, maybe to be able to take advantage of.them again and mabe, if God willed it so, not to be able to do them. Above all the things I didn’t fully appreciate, was my country. It all came free gratis to me. I grew up to expect all the benefits it would and did give me. Now that I am fighting for it, I know what it really means to me. After seeing other parts of the world, I can readily see why men and boys fought and died for it. I just hope I am not alone in my ideas in regard to the war. I hope every single person in America sees it because if they don’t then we are fighting a useless war. “I have seen people killed and wounded because of their country and after seeing all of this I am not afraid because I have faith in God and if His will is for me to die I am prepared, because I go fighting for what I love and cherish, my country. After reading this letter you might think I am preparing you for things to come. I am in a way. What T am trying to put across is I don’t want you to worry about me whatever may come, I was just a little homesick and I wanted to express my feelings about hoifte. I just hope you people back home appreciate the good old U. S. Will write again soon, and hope to make more sense next time. Your loving son, i Fred

Service Story

Fred E Boggeln shanghai story
Fred E Boggeln shanghai story

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